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EPISODE 23

Using New Technology to Win Customer Trust with DeWitt Driscoll, Positive Energy Consulting

August 2021  | 16:20

There’s an adage in writing for the stage and screen: show, don’t tell. That’s an adage that has led to big business for our guest today, DeWitt Driscoll of Positive Energy Consultants. He’s taking on the hardest jobs and using cutting-edge technology to make sure customers understand what they need and how he can help.

In this episode…

1:10 – Building performance is a family affair in the Driscoll household

4:40 – Multiple ways to use sensors to give customers power, earn their trust and ensure the long term success of your install

11:05 – Getting active with a “passive house”

14:07 – Taking on the hard jobs

Using New Technology to Win Customer Trust with DeWitt Driscoll, Positive Energy Consulting

RVAL021.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

RVAL021.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
It became more of a case study in how much we've learned in the last. OK, I

Speaker2:
Have to say that House was more of a passive tragedy than passing.

Speaker1:
We're talking about the one you sent pictures out. Yeah, that's the one.

Speaker3:
This is the one and only the original podcast where you can find yours and your business's true value. You're listening to our values brought to you by America's insulation source, idei distributers. You want to hear from the best contractor suppliers and consultants that dedicate themselves to more than just survival in the business world, industry professionals that are dedicated to excellence in every aspect of their business. Our value has them all here to share that same motivation and knowledge with you. Tune in and grow more successful, profitable, educated and recognize business. Listen to the R Value podcast to become the industry leader in your market. Find your value with our value.

Speaker2:
Well, welcome to today's our Value podcast, folks, and today we are talking with Drouet Driscol out of North Carolina, but you originally actually started up in Pennsylvania. Isn't there some kind of story, DeWit, about you guys having one of the first blower doors that ever walked the dinosaur door is something that you guys were

Speaker1:
Using up there? I yeah, I'm from Southwestern and the building performance is kind of a family trade. My mom got into the industry in the early eighties and when I was just a little kid and she got pulled in by by by her brother in law, my uncle Ken Pollack, with Action Housing, who actually was the first person I think trained to use a blowtorch in Pennsylvania. And it was also the first person doing LODWAR certifications in the area. But he's now a VPI assessor and all that. But, yeah, they were using a back in the day when they had, like, the wooden frames, like the baby gates. It's like pinch them down. And I remember being like eight, nine years old and my mom set one up at our house to test it and try it out. Yes, I've been around the industry for most of my life.

Speaker2:
Well, one thing that came out of Pennsylvania when we were talking, I thought it was really unique and quite an opportunity for you to reach out to the public. Obviously, we've got these two big segments of people that we kind of serve. You've got the what we could call the green people or the people that really conservationist's. They they want to use less. You've got that group and then you've got the group that just wants to be healthy. There's a few out there that just want to save money. But really, these measures don't pay for themselves all the time. But out of that, you mentioned something to me and I was really shocked by it. And that's that you have the opportunity to advertise what you guys have been able to save people and talk about that. You mentioned something about you guys were saving people three to four million kilowatts a year.

Speaker1:
Yeah. Yeah. So the so thing is in Pennsylvania, so are company positive energy consulting is based out of Pennsylvania. I've been expanding North Carolina for the last year, but we work mostly with utility programs up there, weatherization programs and the utility that we work for tracks all of that data. So the where that number comes from is referred to as the deemed lifetime savings. So it's what they anticipate and a measure to save over its lifetime. Right. So an easy example is a light bulb we put in led light bulb take. I think that's a bulb. They're going to anticipate that that would save X amount of kilowatt hours over the 15 years that bulb will last theoretically. So it's a little theoretical, right. But it's just a good way to get an idea. And so based on all the things that we do, light bulbs, thermostats, weatherization, insulation, air sealing, all of it. Right. We in twenty nineteen, we are deemed lifetime savings for all the things that we installed that year was around like three point eight million kilowatt hours. So the things that we install in eighteen over the life of those measures, we we removed almost four million kilowatt hours of of required energy from the grid.

Speaker2:
That is beautiful. So you combine that over the years that it's been in business and you might want to get busy because in North Carolina, your fellow, you're falling.

Speaker1:
Sadly, I got a I got about twelve years of catching up to do so.

Speaker2:
Unlike a lot of the measures you're doing, and I know that you're starting to see some fruit from that down in North Carolina, you're becoming very busy, is that correct?

Speaker1:
Yeah, definitely. It's it's been awesome. I mean, how many people got the opportunity to start a business in the middle of the pandemic? I literally got our license in North Carolina in April of twenty twenty. So I jumped into it right in the middle of all that because there was just a lot of opportunity. People were starting to spend more time in their houses and realized they weren't comfortable or they needed more space. And and there was just room for me then. And you just had been thinking about for a while. And we jumped in and it's been it's been great.

Speaker2:
So one of the things I like, though, we talk a lot about different measures and things that you can do. You've been working on stuff even at your own home that allows you to show. And I just want to reference this. I'm talking everybody about the Cryos censor's MLSE Orio. They're sensors that you can put anywhere you want in your house and they will alert you as to humidity changes, temperature changes. One of the things we talked about, you've got these in your own home so that you can see them, but there's always that person that does not want to take the recommended measure. And where you're at is crawlspace heaven. And you're also foaming attics, correct? So I know as well as you do whatever rises goes up to these addicts that we've now found and now we have problems. So the sensors are you finding these are a great way to work with customers when they don't want to take recommended measures?

Speaker1:
Absolutely. They have a few places. And what I'm doing right now, one is that what you just said a lot of times, you know, the minimum for code in a condition crawlspace is to for conditioned air is to put an inducer on a supply side that is like, what, 30 CFM of air and that meets code. I don't I don't trust that. I don't think it's good enough. You've got your shoulder seasons where the air's not running. Right. You're not conditioning the space. Then humidity is rising. It's going to cause problems. So when I have a customer that's not willing to invest, you know, fifteen hundred or more dollars for a fire on their encapsulation project, I like I will do the minimum will solve their inducer. But I won't leave the sensor here. And I want you to keep an eye on it. And if you see it rising above 60 percent or being sustained above 60 percent for a long time, call me back, because that's going to cause problems. And I don't want the work that I did to become a problem because we needed a little bit more of a way to condition that space. So that's that's worked for me a couple of times. I've had a couple of jobs where I knew that the crawl space was just too big a volume of air and in a really kind of low lying area with a lot of moisture in the ground.

Speaker1:
And it's kind of realizing this is going to be a problem long term. And yeah, people coming back after like a year of like, hey, let's talk about the Minifie. Right. So any other ways I use the sensors, I have them in my house. I've conditioned my crawlspace and my attic so I can show a homeowner this is my house. This is this is right now live real time. These are the readings in my house, you know, it's ninety five degrees out my Addicks, only eighty eight. The humidity is fifty five percent like crawlspaces. Sixty five with forty percent or forty five percent humidity. Everything is where it needs to be. My house is comfortable and it's because of this work. And here are the sensors that show you that. And the other thing is just that an extra selling points like, hey, I know that you care about how your house is performing and you want that knowledge and that power and control over your environment. So I'm going to do this work and want to throw in these sensors for you. It cost me 50, 60 bucks for a set of the sensors or whatever it was. And, you know, I can just give that to the person. And it's just an extra selling point that gives them a little bit of power and makes them trust in me and that I care about the long term success of my install.

Speaker2:
So I love that because so often they feel like you're trying to sell them something when really you're just trying to make them healthy. And the other thing is, knowing my wife, my mom, many of the the women that I've sold to in the past, they do not want to hook that stuff up. They don't want any headache. But if you're willing to go and install the system in your right, they're 70, 80 bucks depending on if you get the two back or three back. But if you're willing to put them in and connect them to the Internet, that also means you get to set it as a beeping sensor on the home station so that if they do go over fifty five in relative humidity, it's going to start this beeping and that alerts them automatically. Hey, look at the app. The app says you've got a problem. It's just a great system to be able to show them that what you were talking about is just the reality of the way the building works. And I love that. So my question for you then, how soon are you going to get some pictures out there and get a blog on Macario sensors and how you use them on every job?

Speaker1:
Yeah, well, you know, I I saw in my house and I was already posting about them the next morning after I put them in my house. So I'm excited. I want to like like a week or two worth of data from my house on these new sensors that I just put them in my house. I'd been using just like the like the cheesy little like Home Depot weather station sensors. Just I knew what was going on a little bit, but yeah, I just had some downtime and thought, let's put these things in and see what they're doing. And yeah, I intend to make them a big part of what I'm doing, not just like a little small afterthought, but I want these sensors and helping people understand what's going on in their house and also validating that I do good work. Right. That's part of it, too. I want them to see they can pull up their phone hoping that sensor and see that they're crawlspaces. Sixty eight degrees and fifty percent humidity all the time because I did good work, you know, and then I won't tell their friends about it.

Speaker2:
I like that. So are you seeing returns coming back in? And elevating your clientele based on the fact that you're doing these additional measures.

Speaker1:
Yeah, absolutely. Little anecdote of that actually in the last couple steps of a really big project that we took on. Really cool house like I told you about. It is a house built in nineteen eighty two designed to be a passive house. And obviously it became more of a case study in how much we've learned in the last. OK, I

Speaker2:
Have to say that house was more of a passive tragedy. We're talking about the one you said.

Speaker1:
Yeah, yeah. That's the one. Yeah. Passive house with fourteen point nine five fifty. There was it was for

Speaker2:
Those of you that aren't familiar with the lingo, it was a passive house, meaning it's supposed to be zero point six air changes per hour. And this thing's run in 15 air changes. The people are sick, the house is uncomfortable. And more or less what they did was made a giant balloon frame where air circulates around the entire home and the place has never been a good place to be.

Speaker1:
Yeah, yeah. I mean, I can see what they were going for 40 years ago, but I. I think it's I like it. I think it's an awesome testament to people. We're trying to do stuff four years ago. Right. And we just we continued on this path that we've been on and we got so much better at it. Right. And because of that, I can go into this house and bring it up to a better standard. I'm excited that I have done a second test. Yeah, but I've done the attic. I've done the crawl space. Go do some interior ceiling. But anyway, that getting back to the point, I got off track that particular job. I was without a doubt and told by the Homer numerous times, the homeowner that I was the highest bidder came in, but he went with me because he knew I'm not a work order guy. Right. I'm not sending a crew out with a work order. And they're going to check off those boxes and leave. I'm a building science professional. I care about the whole house, the whole project. So, you know, and as we were talking when I was leaving the other night from his house, that, yeah, at least a half dozen things already that have popped up that I was able just to take care of and fix and do a little change order and fix that. And, you know, just to make sure that we're doing it right. And that's what he wanted. He didn't want somebody to come in and do the kind of the code minimum and then just try and try and put a Band-Aid on this problem. He wanted a real solution. And that's what I'm trying to set myself apart as I'm the guy that has real solutions to real problems. I can I can I can do the tough fix better than most people in my area. And I'm kind of proud of that. That's something I've been working really hard to constantly learn and constantly growing and taking on new challenges.

Speaker2:
My favorite well, I have to say, I'm very glad I remember our first meeting. And you've been to a few of the classes since then. Hopefully we've we've done some things along the way to give you a boost and help you with it. But you really are going after a better clientele. And quite frankly, I'm glad you're gaining the margins and the benefit from it.

Speaker1:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. It's you know, it's kind of as I've been expanding down here and kind of trying to find my own way with my branch of the company. I but what I want to do, trying to come up with what what my identity is going to be. And every day I just lean more and more towards being that guy, the one that's doing those specialty projects and taking on the hard jobs and just being the guy you call when you really want it done. Right. And I'm testing everything, validating my work with data. And I think I'm just trying to do those things that set me apart more than more than other companies are doing.

Speaker2:
Well, thank you for saying that. I really hope that more people understand there are customers out there looking for people like you and they really aren't looking for short measures then they're not looking for the lowest bidder.

Speaker1:
Yeah, you know what? If more and more contractors get on board with doing high quality work that's tested and verified and done to the best of the highest industry standards, we all win. Right. But we're getting healthier homes. We're going to have your clients and we're all making more money. So I just I hope that more and more contractors start getting on board with doing things the way that I'm trying to do them or at least follow that model of let's let's test these things. Let's let's address the real issues and not just do the quick, cheap solution that's going to get me to get in blossman and get out type of work. Right. So I really hope that that's kind of where people keep heading and we keep doing good work.

Speaker2:
That is awesome. Well, thank you again. DeWit. I'd have to say this podcast started out as a little bit of what people could do for marketing. But the truth is, I'm glad that it turned into what building performance is and what building performance means to margins, to your company, to your growth. And your reputation, I think you've done well.

Speaker1:
Yeah, and we all got an uphill battle with taking care of some of these old homes and I'm happy to be on the front lines of it. So, you know, I appreciate all the support Idei and you've given along the way. It's been great.

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EPISODE 23

Legislation That Will Impact Your Contracting Business with Kara Saul Rinaldi, President and CEO of the AnnDyl Policy Group

August 2021  | 16:52

We have news from the capital city, Washington D.C. that can help you keep more of your capital. Host, Ken Allison, speaks with Kara Saul Rinaldi, the President and CEO of the AnnDyl Policy Group, LLC, a clean energy policy group that works on the federal and state level. Her organization is a driving force behind the Hope for Homes legislation, a bill that would fund training for work on clean energy improvements including insulation, air sealing, and other building performance enhancements.

In this episode…

3:41 – Hope For Homes Act explained in-depth

6:17 – How will the Hopes For Homes Act become a reality?

10:15 – How rebates could play a factor in retrofit jobs at every income level

12:02 – Other legislation that could impact your business soon

14:12 – How contractors can be part of the solution

Legislation That Will Impact Your Contracting Business with Kara Saul Rinaldi, President and CEO of the AnnDyl Policy Group

RVAL020.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

RVAL020.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
And this is the one and only the original podcast where you can find yours and your business's true value. You're listening to our values brought to you by America's insulation source, Idei distributers. You want to hear from the best contractor suppliers and consultants that dedicate themselves to more than just survival in the business world, industry professionals that are dedicated to excellence in every aspect of their business. Our value has them all here to share that same motivation and knowledge with you. Tune in and grow more successful, profitable, educated and recognize business. Listen to the R Value podcast to become the industry leader in your market. Find your value with our value.

Speaker2:
Carlson here with your Value podcast, and today, guys, I am bringing you news from the front, not our front, not the installation front, but we'll just call it Washington, D.C. Not that that's really a front, but we all know what we where the money goes. Speaking of where the money goes, I have with me today Carrousel Renaldi. Kara, you are the main module person for a policy group. Now, can you explain to me what you guys do and why why you do it?

Speaker3:
Or and thanks for having me. I am the president, CEO of the Anvil Policy Group. We are based in Washington, D.C. and we work at the federal and state level and we work on clean energy issues. Anything that is clean energy, energy efficiency, renewable energy, climate change, smart technology, advanced technology, advanced energy. That is our space. It's an energy and environmental strategy firm, which means we do everything from writing reports on what are the new innovations and types of policies that states should be looking at that's giving presentations, speeches, testifying, and also, of course, lobbying on specific issues.

Speaker2:
So when you say lobbying on specific issues, then do do people in the industry come hire you to try and push something through? Or do you guys already have things that you're started an agenda on yourself or both?

Speaker3:
Well, both. Both for sure. I mean, I think our advocacy efforts and the lobbying work that we do and we do, we also we do regulatory, administrative and legislative. And so we I like to say we our job is more to solve problems. So there might be an industry or an NGO who comes and says this is a problem we want to address. These are the issues we need or this is a challenge. We're facing an obstacle to doing business and we want to work through the policy regulatory space to try and address that.

Speaker2:
So, guys, here's the main reason I have carried on here. They are working in the background on something that impacts your business more than you could ever imagine. In fact, their organization is involved directly with some of the bills for funding retrofit improvements for the United States, meaning the insulation, the ceiling, the building performance. And so I know we we went and we did the lobby calls for the hope for Holmesville. But can you explain to our guys what exactly it is that you guys are driving on hope for homes,

Speaker3:
To the hope for how legislation is made up in two parts? Help is the home online performance based energy efficiency training. It's a training. It's training legislation. It's as a program to advance the trainings that we can have more trained workers available for hire. Not only that, so that small businesses can also have an opportunity to get to get funding to train their workers. We hear all the time from contractors how difficult it is to not only find train workers, but then hire somebody, spend the time, energy, money to train them and then potentially invest in them and have that investment walk away. So how do we as a country invest in those train workers knowing that installing insulation and ceiling really is it's a craft and it needs to be taught so that and so there's the hope legislation, the five hundred million dollar program that would help help small businesses and businesses train their workers. Then there's the homes and and Homes is a rebate program. And it has two parts. One is more prescriptive based. You buy that, you buy insulation and you get you get a rebate. Then the other is deeper retrofits. And those deep retrofits would go through the state energy offices. So every state might have a slightly different program, but we're looking at eight point five nine going to hire a billion dollar program. We are looking at this legislation not only and it's very popular, it's bipartisan. It's had a lot of strength behind it. The big issue is how is it going to move through this Congress? It's very challenging moving anything through this Congress. And as soon as it gets passed on success, everyone wants to jump on board. So we also have that problem with people wanting to change the bill, modify the bill and so working. To make sure that we do that in a way that only improves the outcomes once, once it has to be enacted.

Speaker2:
So one thing I like with this, I know there was a really great push in the beginning and we talked to quite a few representatives, there was a lot of buzz and action around it. Since that time, have you seen the bill flounder? Have you seen it actually continue its momentum and more people come on board? What's the temperature, we'll say, of the Homes Act?

Speaker3:
Oh, yeah. We have dozens and dozens of supporters and supporters outside of Congress, including everyone, not just manufacturers and contractors, but also we have environmental groups. We have labor union. We have we have the we have the implementors program implementers have state energy offices. So we have a broad coalition. And that leads to broad support. We have we have a lot of support in the House. Number of members have come on board thanks to that advocacy day that we had. And a number of new members of Congress came on board to that for the legislation as co-sponsors. On the Senate side, we have we are led by three very strong leaders at Kunze Chikin and Van Hollen. Senator Van Hollen is the lead co-sponsor. And and really the issue has not been how many senators do you get on board? Because really what we need is either 60 or 50. So the issue is what what packages can we be a part of? We've already had conversations on the bipartisan infrastructure package that we're all but most of our focus right now is on the reconciliation bill and being a part of budget reconciliation, where a large piece of moneys may go through, may go through Congress and signed by the president and then be able to be utilized by states and others.

Speaker2:
But overall, the temperature is good. Looks like still

Speaker3:
Oh, we are very much in the mix, very much. The next big issue is addressing any controversies that come up. And there are those who want to turn the bill entirely into all electrification because, as you know, electrification and the movement towards renewables, there's a big push to eliminate any elements of fossil subsidy and R and our legislation in the the deep retrofit programs do allow it's all performance based so that the House might be funded by natural gas. And even though our bill requires high efficiency natural gas, that is that has been a controversy in some places, someone to be more natural gas than there's others who want there to be. Hey, there is there's a lot of cheap natural gas out there. Let's make this let's it how do we address to the low income communities? The bill actually doubles rebates for moderate income families. How do we make sure we address and expand the LMI components? Multifamily was in there. We have to make sure. How do we address multifamily better? One thing is for certain and for that for your listeners is that insulation is key. It is always the key and prime component of hope for homes because it is the quickest, cheapest way to increase the energy efficiency and the performance of a building. So that is really been the focus and has always been one of the base pieces of this legislation.

Speaker2:
Well, hopefully a lot of the infighting, whatever you want to call it, gets worked out fairly easily because I know for for most of us, what we really wanted in the end was something that doesn't leave out the forgotten, which is the you mentioned there's low income, there's multifamily. They always get money. But the general consumer is who winds up with what I'd call a pittance. Bill, more often than not, it's like, oh, if you buy a bunch of insulation, we'll give you back five hundred dollars, but you're going to spend ten grand to fix your house. And so the second someone isn't destitute, it's really tough to be part of any of these programs because there's just nobody fighting for them. And I thought that was a good thing on this bill, was that it it didn't just leave out the major segment of the population.

Speaker3:
And the key thing here is environmental justice does play into all of this. And how do we make sure that that LMI community gets served at the same time? But if you look at it from if you're trying to address resiliency in this country, if you want to address reliability of electricity, if you want to address carbon emissions, you can't do that by only addressing the LMI sector. So I think that is really where hope for how steps in and says, OK, we have weatherization and we support that for our low income families. Our moderate income families who still need additional assistance, they may not qualify for low income, but there they still don't have an extra few thousand dollars in the bank to pay for these additional upgrades. And then upper income families say they still need to bring 50 percent of the project to the table. But if they're willing to put in this additional additional money and bring that to the table as well. Well, we should we should be also providing them rebates because, frankly, it helps make the payback work better for them, more likely that they're going to do the project. And that's good for everyone, because that resiliency, those that job creation, that those that carbon reduction, all of that is public good. So it's part of how do we make sure that we bring public goods to the table in a way that that works? And it's it means not forgetting everyone, but bringing everyone to the table as part of the solution.

Speaker2:
I don't want to do anything to delude this effort, but are there other competing efforts, are there other bills that we should be watching out for or trying to support?

Speaker3:
We've gotten really good bills. Yeah, I mean, I think certainly that there's tax legislation. That's when we see tax credit. I think for a lot of your or the 40 45 has to do with new homes, has to have existing homes. These are all important tax policies that are useful for homes. Also, it's a rebate program and which is helpful, particularly if you don't have a tax liability. But tax credits are good, too, and they're part of building that that the capital stack needed to make these projects happen. So both of those bills are something we're working on. And we certainly support the twenty five state legislation as well. The the SAVE Act, which is a way of helping put in all of these measures into the under consideration and your utility bill under consideration when you are refinancing your house or financing your house. So that can be and that's also really helpful because insulation is one of those things people don't see. They see the granite countertops and they see the new bathroom and they see the nice tiles and paint, but they don't see that insulation in the attic, in the walls. And we want that to be accounted for when people are financing their home so that it gets that value and highlights the value. Also, workforce training bills, again, I mean, hope is in there, but there's bigger work for train builders of blue collar to green collar jobs. Bill, how do we help get more people who are in transition to see this industry as a career path? Because I hear from contractors across the country that they need workers, they need good workers and skilled workers, and we want to create more career paths that bring those workers there so that we so people can grow their businesses. We want to create jobs and grow businesses, but we need people to be a part of that.

Speaker2:
Perfect, well, are there things that are Idei contractors should be doing locally in order to help support your efforts and maybe help move this bill forward?

Speaker3:
Now, you should, I would say to every contractor, be a part of this solution. Don't think that you're by reaching out to your member of Congress and telling them you like the help for Helms legislation. It should be a part of the infrastructure bills. Don't think that they're not listening. They absolutely are listening. We got a bunch of new co-sponsors as a result of our lobby days. You can contact Skip on my team who's lurking here on this on this podcast at skep and dot com and then dwil dot com and or me, Karar at Andell back home and be a part of the solution. The other thing is they can join the Building Performance Association. That's who was a part of this lobby day that we did and go to building performance dog. Doyne, as a board member, make sure that you're on you're available for the that next lobby day story, that you're getting our notes and newsletters and know what's happening because these voices from the field matter more than any other voices. So we'd love to help echo what you're what you're feeling.

Speaker2:
That is awesome. I'm so glad you said that, because I. I remember on the Zoome calls, watching the senators and the Congress, people's faces light up when they would see someone local on the lobby call. And it really is the truth. They really want to know that people from their area care about this and have decided that this is something viable that we should be doing so that I cannot thank you enough for taking time to do this again. Guys, that is, you can reach out to Skip or Kara at a n n d y l dot is it. Or dot the dot com and dot com. Thank you again. Any last thoughts for our contractors?

Speaker3:
While the other thing is a giant building performance, that building performance association building performance, Doug, because those guys keep the messages going out there. So I want to keep people informed too.

Speaker2:
Awesome. Will, thank you again for your time and good luck powering this thing through.

Speaker3:
Well, thank you so much for having me and thanks for joining the Labor Day. It was really helpful to have you there.

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Sonix has many features that you’d love including automated transcription, automated translation, upload many different filetypes, advanced search, and easily transcribe your Zoom meetings. Try Sonix for free today.


EPISODE 22

Celebrating Women in Insulation with Rachel Perry, Jessica the Attic Queen, Daja Oliver and Chelsea Whitley

May 2021  | 31:30

This one goes out to all the women out there breaking down glass ceilings and insulating buildings. We’re discussing women in the insulation industry with four of the brightest minds at IDI distributors and the entire industry; Rachel Perry, Commercial Sales Specialist, Daja Oliver, a Branch Manager in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Jessica the Attic Queen out of Tampa, Florida and Chelsea Whitley, SPFE Product and Solutions Manager in Atlanta, Georgia. Each of these industry experts share their unique experiences entering a traditionally male-dominated industry and how they feel like women have changed it for the better.

2:49 – “I feel like a mama bear to some of these guys.”

4:10 – How the Attic Queen claimed her throne

10:58 – “They knew I was organizing, knew I was going to be truthful and honest. And I care. That was the biggest thing when they knew I cared.”

13:38 – Managing the organized chaos for your customers

17:38 – Is this a viable career path for college-educated women?

20:00 – Fighting imposter syndrome

22:48 – The social media advantage

27:44 – “If a woman truly understands the building science behind things, and…loves challenges and loves working out…you can do this job.”

Celebrating Women in Insulation with Rachel Perry, Jessica the Attic Queen, Daja Oliver and Chelsea Whitley

RVAL019.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

RVAL019.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
We’re not golfing, skiing Friday through Monday, we are answering the phone Friday night, we’re answering the phone on Saturday, we’re sending e-mails on Sunday. We don’t spend a day drinking beer on a golf course. That’s not what we do. We’re pushing. We’re working. That’s where we get our joy from. So we’re just different animals.

Speaker2:
And this is the one and only the original podcast where you can find yours and your business’s true value. You’re listening to our values brought to you by America’s insulation source, Idei distributers. You want to hear from the best contractor suppliers and consultants that dedicate themselves to more than just survival in the business world. Industry professionals that are dedicated to excellence in every aspect of their business. Our value has them all here to share that same motivation and knowledge with you. Tune in and grow more successful, profitable, educated and recognize business. Listen to the R Value podcast to become the industry leader in your market. Find your value with our value.

Speaker3:
Ken Allison with the R Value podcast, and we are here today for a very unique mission, we are looking at women in insulation, actually, we’re not looking at them. You’re on a radio or some sort of device. But either way, there are quite a few women in insulation. There’s a lot of women in construction. That’s a group that was founded back in the 80s. But when I look at there’s the women construction owners and executives group that’s been around for quite a while. There’s women in building performance, which is a smaller group. But I think we needed to talk about women in insulation, especially since the building envelope has become so important. And at this point, women are 10 percent of the construction workforce. They are 13 percent of the ownership. So when you look at a lot of the women that are in our industry are actually owners, four percent of all new construction companies right now are owned by women, but yet only one percent are in the front line. And I’m going to start with I’ve got four different ladies here that all do very widely different things in the industry. But I’m going to start with someone known as Dasia all over in the frozen north. Dasia, I’m going to just go right for the throat right out of the gate. You were telling me just a minute ago what the wage was going for, for Sprey farmers in Minnesota. And you’ve got to be joking. You said north of forty dollars. Is that true?

Speaker4:
Yeah, in some cases, absolutely. They’re hard to come by.

Speaker3:
Good night. So so outside because I know that wasn’t the wage when you got in. What, what got you into insulation. What, why this.

Speaker4:
Well I started in two thousand seven selling insulation accessories and about three years later I moved into the whole gamut of fibreglass spray foam, everything insulation. So I don’t know. It’s just I love it. I love building the relationships with the customers. And that’s what keeps me here. I feel like a mama bear to some

Speaker5:
Of these guys, and they are my children and it’s just grown from there. And I love everything about it. I love being on job sites.

Speaker4:
I love being in their offices, everything.

Speaker3:
So you said something different there. And so the momma bear, because one of my questions, honestly, for every one of you is how have men treated you while you’re in the industry? Are they literally becoming your children? Because I know men really aren’t end up being responsible, but.

Speaker4:
Well, some some of them, yes.

Speaker3:
We’ve got someone on here that’s a contractor that I’ve just watched this lady smoke, other guys in an attic and outwork every one of them. Jessica, you’re known as the attic queen. Why on God’s earth did you get into construction in the first place? What what happened?

Speaker5:
I was recruited by the top installation company in Tampa, Florida. And when they first met me, it was at an event that they were soliciting their services. And I was doing something else. I was in real estate for 16 years, vice president of lending. And I had a life coach that didn’t realize nothing was more important than health and happiness. So I quit my job, had nothing going on, but I would do a side project. So I meet the owner. And how are you? I said I’m better than good and I’m better than most. What? So right away you left my energy, including me. I’m like, listen, I just took the handcuffs off after being in the corporate world for 16 years. I’m not interested. So I ended up with some consulting and he kept in touch. And it was November I was doing consulting out in Texas and he called me up because, like, my business is exploding. I really miss Florida. So I come back, we’ll talk about working. So I’m like, all right. So I come back to Florida and I’m watching what’s going on. And I’m like, yeah, this is great. I could. You wanted me to do sales. So we started talking to terms. He’s like, well, you are going to be straight commission and if you go through a ceiling, I’ll pay for the first one. But everyone after that, you’re going to have to pay for it. I’m like, oh my God, I can’t afford to do this. So I kind of like stepped back and work the office, listen to him learned, would help out on, like, big removals. And that’s when I started getting interested.

Speaker5:
covid hit and then we exploded and I turned into a team lead because I always took on like the toughest things. And it was a really good workout. The gyms were shut. There was no soreness, no gyms. So I remember my very first day was a removal of six forty five. Am I not going to buy yellow t shirts, my bright red lips? I said I’m just going to do your removal. They said you. I’m like, yes, I’m like, let me tell you, my favorite at home is the vacuum and nobody can vacuum up that better than me. The like. Come on in. At that point it was like to me a challenge and then I never really so I learned on the job and I just love going through hard things in life. I just thought to myself, where things really became real for me was when I took my first formalized training. Why do you want to you get out? And it was to learn about spray foam and literally what it does. It scared the hell out of me and made me realize to build a strategic partnership, find a good, capable company. But that’s when I started learning the building science behind things and how it really affects the health of people. And that’s really what makes me go to work every day. And extreme temperatures, because these people need us like people are in their house getting sick and we don’t even know it’s because there’s like, literally. Boxes in their attic or there is like mold everywhere, and there’s so much leakage, so thanks to you for opening up my eyes, I could save the world.

Speaker3:
Wow. That’s you are always a handful. I mean, we’ve got to get a governor on something we’re going to have to give.

Speaker5:
You know, it amazes me.

Speaker3:
I have to tell people, you at three hundred to three hundred and fifty square feet an hour, backing out an attic is at the top of the industry. We have so many people that don’t have the dexterity or the health to be able to do that and then to see some of your posts online. It’s just it’s crazy how you’ve taken to this industry. So I’m not going to ask you if you think you made a mistake, you’re you’re making everybody else look like we’re unenthusiastic about it. It’s amazing. So so let me ask you something, though. How how would you see or what do you think would be our best tool for recruiting women? How how could we get more of you into the industry? Because when I when I laid out the facts just to cover it again, so 13 percent or owners, but eighty five percent, I think, is what women in construction said are in the office. How do we get them to understand? It’s a great workout. It’s a good day. You feel good and the money’s excellent. What would you think would gather more to the industry with me?

Speaker5:
And also you

Speaker3:
Said everybody needs to go to Florida and getting an adequate

Speaker5:
I literally drove nine hours to be on this podcast. So I do travel. I also I wholesale a couple of products as well, like the Atkins later and then added. So I do work with companies nationwide and help them with business growth and business development. And being that I use those products on my own and we all know that the rising price of inflation is ridiculous. I don’t understand how companies can stay in business and have other products. Now I do travel and it’s like I got somebody offered to fly me to Pennsylvania. They remove all their insulation. I’m like, yeah, I will travel back, will travel. I mean, let’s go.

Speaker3:
There’s a testimony. So Chelsea, with you, I know you kind of came in with some people that you knew from the equipment side of things. But what really what drove you from college to insulation? What.

Speaker4:
Where was the connection to, you know, it was it was the luck of the draw, I was just sitting at home bored after not working for a little bit, and I had some friends who were like, hey, wait a minute, fraction manufacturing companies, rifle rigs, anything, anything, fluid applied. And so they’re like, come into the phone for us. I was like, OK, give me something to do to get out of the house. And it just evolved into I have a marketing background, so just involved. After a few months of answer the phone, they’re like it’s equipment. You have cell phone, so you want to sell it yourself. I guess I just learned all the material had really good like a support system. People that trained me and educated me at the industry, started traveling, started going to trade shows and just really enjoyed. I enjoyed being one of the only women in the industry. It was it was odd at that time. I was 12 years ago, it was a handful of us. So when we walked in and we were like, oh, we automatically know them. And I’ve always, always enjoyed that. So that’s really what I was like, wow, I can be somebody here. And then it just grew from there and, you know, take care of these customers. And I have so much trust in me because I guess being a female, they I knew I was organized. I knew I was going to be truthful and honest and like, I care now is the biggest thing I knew. I cared about them and their business, the relationship. Did you find it?

Speaker3:
Did you find it easier to get trust then?

Speaker4:
Absolutely. I did. When I came into it. Also, being just a Southerner, I think they were automatically like, oh, she’s super sweet and I know she cares about us. That momma bear mentality that Dasia was talking about us. I mean, it was just like, OK, here’s everything, help me figure it out. And problem solvers, that’s that’s our job. So I think that I found comfort in that. And it just kind of the relationship just grew and grew and grew after that, and everybody like Dasia being in the industry and being asked specifically, you know, I knew where I worked and they’re like, I want to talk to Chelsea. So that’s just kind of where it went. And it just grew from there. And now a lot of them are some of my best friends. And so my mentors are people I’ve mentored. And it’s just it’s just a family circle.

Speaker3:
I’m going to go to Rachel Carey up in Boston now. Rachel, with you, you had a background somewhat similar to something I used to do to tell people how you wound up in the industry.

Speaker1:
I like to start a long time ago, back in nineteen ninety seven. I worked for I spent a summer in Katy, Texas, and I worked for a man named Don Savage Soula who opened fire safe in Houston. And I worked for him for a summer just fireproofing buildings like the rice building when they renovated it. So I’m 19 years old with a hard hat and two belt and going into these buildings. From there, I came back to Boston. I got into the restaurant business and I spent almost 20 years in restaurants working in high end steak houses like Capital Grill, Fleming Steak House in Scottsdale, Arizona, Boston, Providence. And I went to Strega Waterfront, which was a very high profile fine dining restaurant and probably one of the busiest restaurants in the city at the time where I met a gentleman named Frank Sinatra, who’s the owner of General Installation Company, which says,

Speaker3:
Wait a minute, you were the general manager of that restaurant where, you know,

Speaker1:
I was the assistant general manager and I was the first female manager that this gentleman ever employed.

Speaker3:
There you go. So you were not at the bottom of the restaurant. It’s not like you were a waitress. And some guys like, hey, you want to put in insulation, it’s got to be big.

Speaker1:
No, no.

Speaker5:
So go ahead

Speaker1:
Now. So I shot everybody here, knows general inflation and knows Frank. And I was thirty seven years old at the time and I was just tired of working every weekend, every holiday. It was great in my twenties. But you get to an age where it just it’s not a good lifestyle. So I took the leap and my mother thought I was crazy to change careers and I was just really getting somewhere working in the best restaurants in the city and in the road to do sell insulation, which she didn’t really understand. But I love it. It feeds so much of what the restaurant gives me with what my personality loves, the time management, the competitiveness, the teamwork, the problem solving. Like Chelsea said, it’s all this pressure. But but keep the keep the veneer. Keep the facade of we’re in control and I’ve got it and I’ve got your back and I’m going to fix your problems. It’s an organized chaos that I think we all manage for all of our customers. So it’s awesome. I love that side of it. It’s afforded me a much better quality of life. I just I was able to buy my own home on five acres in New Hampshire. I drive an F one fifty supercute. It’s just a life that I never thought I would I wouldn’t have if I stayed where I was.

Speaker3:
So I love that. No, no. Talk a little bit about your challenge, because you’re you’re really even for our industry, your towards the top end of our industry in that you’re taking on probably the tiniest fraction of sales in our industry by chasing large specifications hospitals, schools, libraries, doctors offices. You’re doing commercial construction sales. How how does that work for you in going out and really opening doors and getting in in the career path? How’s that working for you? And what do you see as the best part?

Speaker1:
I think it’s all comes back to the customer service aspect and it’s building the relationships, and I’ve been working with some of these project managers from, you know, for five, six years. And they followed me from General to New England Gypsum, where I was before I die. And now they’re with Idei because it’s all about understanding their needs. Answer your phone. Get back to them right away. Make everybody feel like they are the most important thing in your world. And I lean on them for help. If I don’t know, I’ll ask them. A lot of these project managers. I help them out. They help me out. I learn every day something new. As you know, with building I up. It’s always changing and the tests are always so.

Speaker3:
Yeah, it is. But something something you said I really keyed on and that’s that’s loyalty. You know, women are known as loyal and and I don’t know that that’s really a knock on men. But, you know, Daja, you mentioned Mama Bear. Chelsie talked about her friends, brought her in. It seems to me that if I were to have someone long term, their customers really are going to follow them. They really are going to be more of a family than golf buddies, you know, and I mean that in hopefully the nicest of ways. But it seems like many men are golf buddies or fishing buddies.

Speaker1:
But can I you I mean, I will say actually to a former co-worker of mine who’s also a female, I’m like, we’re not golfing and skiing Friday through Monday. We are answering the phone Friday night. We’re answering the phone on Saturday. We’re sending emails on Sunday. We don’t spend a day drinking beer on a golf course. That’s not what we do. We’re pushing. We’re working. That’s where we get our joy from. So we’re just different animals.

Speaker3:
If you had a 19 year old daughter who was going to college, is this a career path you would want her to take, knowing the way the industry is?

Speaker1:
I think there’s so much

Speaker4:
Opportunity that

Speaker3:
Women have. You are nodding

Speaker4:
In empowering this this industry. And just how much I have grown as a person and as a professional has taken me to traveling everywhere in the United States, have ever wanted to go to financially living on my own. Like being able to support myself. I mean, that the sky’s the limit. It’s it’s it’s awesome. And it’s it’s so empowering.

Speaker3:
Well, that is great to hear. So, Dasia, you know, I went to you first, but what are your thoughts on if if we wanted to target more women? When I look at this, I see career paths from installer to building scientist or to architect. But but where, where would you start in trying to bring more women to the industry

Speaker5:
And really how to bring

Speaker4:
Them to I mean, just explain to them what we do and all the wonderful things that come along with it, like the relationships you build out there, the the the people you meet, everything. It’s just it’s in all in a whole it’s wonderful. I mean, I know a bunch of women and we have quite a few here. And I love seeing them out there. And I just I think it’s so awesome. And they work just as hard as those guys. And I just I have five of them. Every time I see them, I love it.

Speaker3:
So then what’s been your biggest challenge?

Speaker4:
I mean, how we get as women, sometimes we’ll look at you and don’t think you will know what you’re talking about because we are women. I mean, that’s probably the toughest when you girls say the same thing. Oh, yeah, for sure.

Speaker5:
That was my first hang up because I was basically I’m like I’m a woman. I don’t know what I’m talking about. I’m going to fall through every ceiling. I’m like a wrecking ball, like nobody’s going to trust me. And then she trusted me more when I showed up. And now that I know what I’m talking about and I know who Khalistan is and I called him from Addicks, when things go on and I get answers, I’m like, I’m unstoppable now. I’m like, I literally know what I’m talking about. And it’s like when you tell that to people and they get freaked out at first, but they’re like, fix it. Yes, I’ll fix it. Yeah.

Speaker4:
So you have to begin with. But once you forgive yourself like the women, I mean they talk to you in a matter of minutes, they’re like, whoa, who really knows what she’s talking about? And then it’s like, OK, let me let you man training sites you pull up in your training clothes and you know, I’m doing a blown in while training and then look at you like, oh, you do know what you’re doing. Yeah, that is so satisfying. Isn’t the planet just out there. That’s all you got to do. If you can put yourself out there, just do it.

Speaker3:
Rachel with you has because you’re on commercial jobs, have you had the same thing where it’s really just a matter of proving your knowledge and then the doors open or do the doors just open?

Speaker1:
That’s that’s an interesting question. I do. I’ll answer the second part. I in my experience, I do feel for cold calls. I think men are more apt to sit down and talk to me than they are if a guy walks in. And I know that’s a sexist, but I know that being a woman does open more doors. It lets me in. You know, what I do with that is that’s on me. Can I landed or not? But I think, as in general, men are more apt to talk to women throughout the day. I don’t think they’re as upset at bustin their office.

Speaker3:
I think that’s a great point, though, because if I’m considering what industry should I go into? If I walk into a doctor’s office as a pharmaceutical rep every day, I know for a fact that receptionist will shut down any skirt, any suit, any shoe, any whatever that walks through the door. They’re used to it. But in this industry, if it is a more open lane for you to be heard, then why not jump in? It makes total sense to me. But, Jessica, I want to come back to something because you really are unique. Yes. You you’ve done some selling and you do some training. But, girl, what is it that makes you want to get in an attic when it’s one hundred and fifty degrees and just go rip the place apart like a tornado? I mean, you’re just when you’re in an attic,

Speaker5:
It’s like a mindset thing and it’s like you can’t get a better workout. Like I didn’t know what I was going to do. What would I have done? Like all the gyms were set during covid. Like, I can’t not work out. That’s I like my mental. So it’s like addicts are hotter than Sonus. And when you’re like, literally in. And you got to like and you can’t get that lifting weights, so that’s part of it, but

Speaker3:
I don’t know. Well, and I have to throw out a shout out. Jessica is the attic queen. She’s wearing a shirt that says The Attic, and she Instagram’s is the attic queen. You’ve got to see her stuff. The other day when you held up the dead rat carcass or dead squirrel carcass in the attic and you looked at the camera and go, what’s in your attic? I was like, wow, that is so close to infringement and yet perfect. I just I love your attitude towards this.

Speaker4:
Can you just head on social media? I think it’s also a big part. Majority of women I know are more active on social media, and they are they put themselves in the spotlight more. They’re on their own Instagram. They’re on every platform. So they’re saying they’re heard. And I think that’s a big that’s a big thing, too. That’s being thing, being active on social media and putting yourself out there.

Speaker5:
It’s like you get business from it. If you’re sitting there telling people like, you know, if you’ve got the species in there and your house has air leakage and you’re breathing it in like you are going to get sick, and then people are like, oh, my God, I never thought about this. And they lay up at night and they hear, like scuffling. I got rats and I get a call, you know, and it’s like

Speaker4:
Magic all the time. Exactly.

Speaker3:
So the lesson that I get out of this is if I had a contracting company, I need a woman with that kind of understanding about doing my selling. Because the way you describe that, about laying in bed and hearing it, you know, we’ve all been there, but I just kind of dismiss it. And, of course, it goes through someone else’s head like a hundred times at night. Now, that is perfect. And Chelsea, you’re right, social media, you guys dominated from Pinterest on down. You know, it kind of started long ago in Facebook and Pinterest and now it’s haoles and next door and all of those. But you’re right, you guys are far more active. So any last thoughts, Rachel? Any thoughts you’ve got towards anyone out there and listening? Obviously, most of them at this point in the industry are men. What would you want them to understand about how they should be looking toward the future of their company?

Speaker1:
I mean, I would never it’s you’re never too old to learn something new. You’re never too old to reinvent yourself. I think, as Jessica stated as well, take the leap. You know, if you’re not happy, find something that you love and and do it. Don’t be afraid.

Speaker3:
I like it. What are your thoughts if you were to speak to contractors that might even be thinking about what their kids should be doing and who they should give their business to, any advice for them?

Speaker4:
Find something that fits you. Find something that you’re comfortable with. Find find your niche. That’s the biggest thing. Find your niche and find your comfort zone and go from there.

Speaker3:
I would think they need to get their daughters involved. And I’m telling you, just with the four of you, I mean, you all found this almost by accident, but yet it really you can tell just by the life that you guys have when you talk about it. Chelsea, what are your thoughts? You were very active in college, would you ever go speak at colleges?

Speaker4:
Oh, for sure. I would love that. And that’s that that is one of the things that I love about this industry. Is it? There’s open doors for opportunities that I’ve always wanted to do, public speaking. Being on video, I want to trade shows and incorporate in training classes all the things that I have a background of. I just didn’t know that that’s where that’s I didn’t know at the time. That’s what I wanted. But now that I start doing these, it’s like, oh, I have a love and I want more and I want more. So I mean, just the springform industry, the insulation industry in general has opened up so many other opportunities because there’s so many people that we need. There’s we need people in this industry to know what they’re doing that are educated. And I don’t know, you kind of see a pattern like everybody that I’ve ever known that’s come into this industry. They don’t leave like we’re here forever. So it’s it’s a very passionate, passionate industry to get into. And I just just want to do what you do, what you love. And I think the opportunities are endless.

Speaker3:
Jessica, I’m going to steal what Chelsea said. Are you truly in this industry forever? I know it’s a dumb question before I ask, but I want you to give your your pitch.

Speaker5:
Well, basically, my goal is to retire in two years and yeah, I’ll be in it for the long run. But not all heroes wear capes. Some of them wear respirators. And what I know, one thing that they just said is do what makes you comfortable. I’m going to step out of your comfort zone, do what makes you uncomfortable. And if I could give anybody the reason why, I think women would be amazing in this industry where meticulous. I know a lot of women love vacuuming, like there’s so much therapy in it. And when you know how it could affect somebody’s life, I walk into a house a couple of weeks ago where there was massive rodent infestation and there was 18 inches clearance and there was that insulation. And it’s a big metal ducking down the center. And there’s a five year old five year old grandson has severe asthma and her husband has very bad allergies and sinus problems. And literally, the only way to do this is to either cut the sheetrock out or to raise the roof line. And it’s like there are people that literally are so sick and it’s like women care. You know, you talked about us being mama bears. I’m that person that, like, you can’t do this job if you drink alcohol, if you do drugs, you don’t sleep. So I’m that mama that shows up to the job site, making sure that these guys have electrolytes and they have real food, not processed food getting through this. So it’s like, look out for my crew. But the people don’t understand, like, OK, somebody told me I had thrown feces in my attic. I’ll just blow on top of it. No, no, no, no, no, no, no. It’s still going to come through like. No. So it’s like if if a woman truly understands the building science behind things and if it’s a woman that loves challenges and loves working out, I’ll tell you, like especially women, women have children. So if you can have a child, you can do this job.

Speaker3:
So that’s that it sounds to me like we should be recruiting at the gym, let’s go. Yeah, I’m not going to be the one to walk up to them. I’ll take you to all our restaurants.

Speaker1:
Restaurant workers are very good. You can work in a restaurant. You can survive anything.

Speaker3:
Yeah, that’s true. It takes a lot to serve food. It takes a tremendous amount of dexterity and health and. Yeah, and memory. You’re it’s it’s very fitting for every bit of our career. I agree with that. Well, I look forward to this. I hope you ladies do more podcast together. I’ve got some guests coming from Building Performance Institute and there’s quite a few owners out there. I wish you all the best and I hope that you guys get together regularly and do these and start getting more women into the industry. I think every one of you were a joy, and I am so glad you’re here and your careers are living proof that we need more of you guys doing this

Speaker5:
And we need more canals. And I need a show on HDTV sponsored by Idei with 10 hours,

Speaker3:
You are going to retire in two years. You never stop plugging away.

Speaker4:
That’s that’s that’s that’s how we are. That’s amazing.

Speaker3:
I love it. Thank you all so much for doing this today.

Speaker4:
Thank you, panel. And I feed forward to many, many more of these together and having some exciting people and women in other industries in this industry, just this women that kick butt and. Yeah, let’s go after each other.

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EPISODE 21

Managing Multiple Crews with Bryon Adamczyk

April 2021  | 13:15

Bryon Adamczyk, President of AI Building Products, knows what it takes to hire, train and manage multiple teams of contractors. In this episode, he shares his no-nonsense insights into obtaining, retaining and training talent that will save your business money and reputation. 

AI Building Products was founded in 2018 in Fort Myers, Florida and has been providing service excellence in Fort Myers and South West Florida ever since.

In this episode…

2:00 – Hiring multiple crews and avoiding the “Gypsy Effect”
3:45 – Retaining top contracting talent
5:26 – Providing crews work without the burnout
7:00 – Bridging cross-cultural barriers in your crews
9:35 – Use it or lose it: preventing product waist

Managing Multiple Crews with Bryon Adamczyk

RVAL018.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

RVAL018.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
10 percent of what you said you should be able to save or if you save all that material and all your scrap and you can use that 10 percent every 10 houses, free material that's free realizing your profitability.

Speaker2:
This is the one and only the original podcast where you can find yours and your business's true value. You're listening to our values brought to you by America's insulation source Idei distributers. You want to hear from the best contractor suppliers and consultants that dedicate themselves to more than just survival in the business world, industry professionals that are dedicated to excellence in every aspect of their business. Our value has them all here to share that same motivation and knowledge with you. Tune in and grow more successful, profitable, educated and recognized business. Listen to the hour value podcast. To become the industry leader in your market. Find your value with our value.

Speaker3:
Ken Allison with Ideas, our Value podcast this week we are talking with Brian Adam, check a I Industries or A.I. building products out of Fort Myers, Florida. Brian, how's it going today?

Speaker1:
It's going great. Oh, fantastic. Can't complain.

Speaker3:
Nice. Yeah, it's great to live in paradise.

Speaker1:
It's why I'm here. I love it tirman every day.

Speaker3:
So let me ask you something. We were talking on the phone the other day and you brought up just some different things about hiring. And I wanted to ask you, you know, I know you've been at this since twenty eighteen, but in that time, obviously you worked with some of these guys before then. How many crews do you have right now?

Speaker1:
Right now we're running eight. Crews will run basically up to 12 when we're really rocking and rolling. But pretty much aides are going to be OK.

Speaker3:
And then how long have you had, like your longest running crew? How long I know you purchased the business. So how long had the longest running crew really been involved?

Speaker1:
A and his sister have been with us since the start. But I've been who I worked with when I was with the TCI before I brought them out. I even was there. A couple of these guys worked with Ivan there back in 2012 and even a little bit before that. So we've had some guys have been with us almost ten years now. Beautiful. Count it that

Speaker3:
Way. That's some nice longevity. Now, how many trades do you guys do

Speaker1:
For five roughly? We do soffit fascia. That's one gutters, insulation, screen enclosures, Underland eyes and hurricane shutters. So we prepare for hurricanes and all that. Put those up and you do spray foam, but we subcontract that out.

Speaker3:
Ok, but yourself installing all of your batts blow, stuff like that. That's correct. OK, now what about turnover? How often do you really have turnover?

Speaker1:
That depends right now. It's called the gypsy effect, these guys come and go, we've got our core installers that have been with us since the beginning, which is probably six of the eight. And we just got a couple of guys that came back. They left for two, three months. They came back. They're back sort of a revolving door. And that's what we call it, the gypsy effect. Someone'll offer them more money. They'll go over there and they'll realize that it's pretty nice here.

Speaker3:
So you get poacher's. It's just a better place to be. OK, now why what's the main reason for coming back? Is what what's the difference, you think, in terms of keeping them and getting them to come back?

Speaker1:
Well, I think it's the work we got that we do have the work. We know that. We put a lot of pride when we answer our phones, we show up on the jobs, we don't show up, we let them know they call us for the bid. We do it most of the time. We can be there within two to three days for the competition. Sometimes they'll say they're six weeks out. We talking to a gentleman today. Steve, one of our builders told them we were there, stucco guys were there and they wanted us to leave. And he said, no, I've been waiting eight weeks. I talked to you. You showed up four days later. And it's just simple logic. They call you, you answer, they leave you a message, you call back, they tell you they're ready to get to it as soon as possible.

Speaker3:
But I mean, the crews. Why do you think the crews come back in terms of, oh,

Speaker1:
We got we got the work and they're pretty much they're pretty much their own boss. You know, they come in, they fill out their paperwork, they get their paperwork for the day. We give them more than enough work, more work than they can do in a day. So they know if they want to have a real good day, they're out installing. We do pay. We do pay piecework so they know what they need to do in a day. So the average installer we have is going to do anywhere from two hundred to two hundred and fifty dollars a labor per guy a day. We'll put out to guy a two man crew. We'll give them six hundred dollars worth of labor. So if they want to make three hundred bucks today and the days right. And they're feeling good, they can have that opportunity. So we have plenty of work

Speaker3:
Now as far as overtime then and burnout. I know, you know, you've got a lot of guys that like to bite off everything they can and then next thing you know, they're not showing up. How do you balance the whole amount of workload you give them and try and prevent them from burning out experience?

Speaker1:
I mean, you'll see it. And like I said, what I mean, experience. I've been doing this since ninety two and you'll know what a guy talking insulation, the guy saying in six hundred square feet an hour continuously. All of a sudden you're looking at him and he's taken and you're only doing three hundred feet an hour for that day. You went from thirty two hundred square foot in a day to twenty four. You know something's up, you look at the job, see what it is, and we find out it's burnout. What I do and Ivan does is will back will back up on what we're giving him, give them some easier stuff, help them out. Don't let them work Saturdays. Why do these guys love to work Saturdays?

Speaker3:
So you try and put the governor on as soon as you see a slowdown in the production rate itself.

Speaker1:
The other thing we'll do is we'll follow the money their way. I mean, they want to make money and doing good. But, you know, a couple of the guys we said, here, take your wife out to dinner on Saturday, enjoy it. Just take some time off.

Speaker3:
You'd also mentioned something that I didn't really think about. You know, there's obviously times that you're going to find things are missing. You get shrinkage, you get side work. You mentioned cultural differences. Talk about that, about how you address things to prevent people from leaving, but yet stop. What's creating a problem for you?

Speaker1:
The good thing is, is I got Ivan. Ivan, I've known Ivan since two thousand seven. We've worked together in prior lives and other companies and. He's got a good network of guys, if we need guys, you can find guys, you can get guys. And I've learned over the years to listen to them, we work really well together, as I said, but he's. Taught me how to treat these guys, I mean. You and I grew up in our culture where yellers and screamers, you don't do that. You sit there, you talk to people, if you need to reprimand them, you need to talk to them about something. You do it behind closed doors. You don't do it in front of other people. You do that. It's sort of the bottom of the totem pole. They go to the bottom and people sort of shun them and then they're gone.

Speaker3:
Yeah, you mentioned the doing that to guys say that come in from Mexico or Latin America, that that's literally seen in their culture as something very wrong. It's a just an absolute total disrespect. Even if they have done something very wrong to you, you cannot confront them in front of people.

Speaker1:
Exactly. You've got to do it behind closed doors because they'll take that as disrespect. And when you lose, everyone wants respect and they look for that. They look for that respect. And when you get disrespected, again, as I said, you're at the bottom and people sort of back off and they don't like that makes sense.

Speaker3:
So who's your best recruiter then, Ivan?

Speaker1:
Really? Oh, yeah, he's like I said, when I first came down here in 2012, Ivan was here, we pretty much all in the market. We were like one of the only installers that was doing everything that we're doing. So we trained a lot of these guys still today, gutters, there's no inspection for gutters. People put gutters on the houses, soffit and thate, aluminum soffit. And fascial is just coming around. And we were we brought it into the market. We showed people how to install it. We trained these installers. So there was a good group. We ran at IVP. We had twenty six crews so that those twenty six crews, you know, they kept on multiplying come in. And Galán, we put guys in other places so we got a good network of guys and we still talk to those guys today and they'll find out, OK, hey, we need guys. Well we'll put the word out and we will find some more installers. Guys that just moved here just came to this country and we're willing to train them.

Speaker3:
I know a lot of guys really respect him. He's he's been on a foam rig in a fiberglass rig in Mississippi, Arizona, Florida. He's he's been around and obviously been in the business a long time. You also mentioned something about because your waste factor is very low. You don't have a lot of money that you lose there. How do you keep that down and how are you encouraging them to use it?

Speaker1:
Well, that's my sticking point. I've you know, I grew up my dad told me how to pick up nails. We put them in a can. We saved them. We used the same splashier I got here. I see a bad I see a Raima Staple's. I see a proper vet on a job site that goes back in my truck and it's going on the next truck that's going out and all that adds up when you're talking about the aluminum. We don't let them we don't let them leave any trash on site. All the trash comes back here. We see what's coming off the trucks. And if it's usable, it's going back out. If it's scrap, it goes into our scrap pile. We recycle all the aluminum, the bats, the blow, the proper vents, all that stays in that area and that goes out on the next truck for the next day. And that's where you make your money if you can. From the insulation standpoint. 10 percent of what you said you should be able to save or if you save all that material and all your scrap and you can use that 10 percent, every tenth house is free material, that's where you realize it and your profitability.

Speaker3:
I knew a guy that actually took one of the 55 gallon bags and tucked it into his belt on his pants. Every time he cut about, he put the extra piece in the bag and he just keep carrying that forward and the bag never got full. Yeah. So he was always using his waist

Speaker1:
And we did that. We put that on the studs and all that. But again, you can use it for your Jois and you can use it for pack around your windows and doors. So every piece you save, if it's 30 cents, that's three dollars for every bat you save, if it's three cents a square foot, 30 cents a square foot.

Speaker3:
So you mentioned before that currently you're subbing out all of your spray foam work. Correct. So with subs, what are your best practices on subs?

Speaker1:
It's tough, I mean, they they get the cash jobs, they get the money jobs they want to put you second, you got to what we do is we make sure we're in constant communication with them. We pay them as soon as they're done. So they're not I mean, not immediately, but they turn in the invoice. They got a check within a couple of days. So they're not waiting for their money where they might have to fill another building, that they might wait 15 days, 30 days. They're just waiting a few days for us. So we tend to get some better subs that way. They tend to do better work for us. But right now, with the current situation in the marketplace where people are just looking for material, if you have material, a lot of these homeowners are paying cash. It's like I said, it's tough right now. But we we're doing OK.

Speaker3:
So you find them paying them right away really is the biggest key of money, still making money is king perfect? Well, obviously money is king in your recruiting. Money is king with your cruise. Yeah, it seems to me like your guys really like you and they they definitely want to stay around. So good for you and thank you for sharing that stuff with us.

Speaker1:
And we appreciate everything you guys do for us, too.

Speaker3:
Well, thanks so much. You have a great day. And may twenty twenty one be a much better year?

I hope so.

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EPISODE 20

Sound Insulation Strategies with Brendan Van Gool and Jason Howell of The Rockwool Group

March 2021  | 27:00

To keep the outside, outside and the inside dry and quiet takes a lot of science. No one knows that better than The ROCKWOOL Group who has been protecting residential and commercial properties from moisture and sound pollution since 1909. Host Ken Allison welcomes Brendan Van Gool and Jason Howell from the ROCKWOOL Group to discuss the world of exterior insulation and the unique challenges that different environments bring to a building project.

The ROCKWOOL Group is the world’s leading manufacturer of stone wool insulation. They offer a full range of high-performing and sustainable insulation products for the construction industry.

On this episode…

1:03 – What’s special and innovative about Rockwool?
5:02 – Getting product to contractors faster
8:04 – The fastest growing market for Rockwool
15:25 – Top picks for fastenings systems
21:25 – Is Rockwool really better for sound?

"Sound" Insulation Strategies with Brendan Van Gool and Jason Howell of The Rockwool Group

RVAL017.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

RVAL017.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

And this is the one and only the original podcast where you can find yours and your business’s true value.

You’re listening to our values brought to you by America’s insulation source, Idei distributers. You want to hear from the best contractor suppliers and consultants that dedicate themselves to more than just survival in the business world, industry professionals that are dedicated to excellence in every aspect of their business. Our value has them all here to share that same motivation and knowledge with you. Tune in and grow more successful, profitable, educated and recognize business. Listen to the R Value podcast to become the industry leader in your market. Find your value with our value.

Ken Alison on the R Value podcast, and today we are talking with Rockwool, that is not a sweater you wear to a concert. It’s an insulation product. Actually, it’s a lot more than an insulation product. And I have Brandon and Jason from Rockwool this morning. Guys, how are you doing today? Have a great weekend. Thank you. Very, very good. Brendan, let me start with you. What what got you in, why Rockwool?

Well, I think, you know, Rockwell from the start was very sustainable in my eyes, I mean, they’re very energy conscious. They’re they’re really into it with the planet and trying to be very energy efficient. So I think that’s what spoke most to me when starting with the company four years ago now. Beautiful.

Jason, how about you? Didn’t you aren’t you, like, archaic with the company? Didn’t you founded or something?

Yeah, well, I’ve been here for about 12 years now, and what got me was the multitude of products that we offer for different applications in residential and commercial buildings. I feel like we can offer something for for everything and really target a lot of customers.

Beautiful. Now, what’s the most innovative use you’ve seen? You said there’s a lot of uses. What do you think’s the most innovative use you’ve ever seen?

Well, from my point of view, like I said, I’ve been here for 12 years and I’ve seen all the building products that we that we make and sell for residential and commercial buildings. But I didn’t know anything about agricultural use with Rockwool or Groden Line and and our line of ceiling tile products. I didn’t know anything about that before coming over to this side of our business and some of the stuff that we’re doing within Rockwool in different segments around the world, it’s just so interesting and fascinating. And it goes back to that sustainability conversation as well.

Well, I know I’ve seen you guys used on kilns. I’ve seen you used in power plants. What’s what’s an egg use that that caught your your attention.

Sure. So it’s a product called Groden and I don’t know the ins and outs of it, but but maybe Brendan can offer a little bit more detail on it. But it’s basically a block of stone wall insulation, I think without the binder that holds water and creates a more favorable or effective way of growing tomato plants. You know, now it’s medical cannabis is really getting going to be a big thing for them. A multitude of products for a multitude of plants and fruits that that they want to grow in greenhouses. And Brendan, maybe you know a little bit more about it.

Yeah, I mean, the main thing that is different between our product and Groden is our product. We put a an oil into the product that repels water so nothing can get into the product.

I am glad you said that. I am so glad you said that because, yeah, when I first with what Jason said, it was like, oh boy. Well, but when you look at your product on the outside of a building, explain why it repels that water, because a lot of people get worried when we look at building eight percent of the cost of a building is damp proofing or moisture proofing. And yet eighty percent of the lawsuits are moisture related. So explain that process of the oil and how the product actually repels that. That’s that’s a big point.

Yeah. I mean, I won’t get into too much of the detail of the production, but basically when the product is being produced, it’s spun into these fibers. And right at the beginning, when these fibers are created, there is an oil basically sprayed into the product so that it’s throughout the entire product. It’s not just sprayed onto the face at the end, it’s throughout the entire product. And it really just repels any moisture that may come in contact with it. So if something is splashed onto it, it heats up and rolls off the face of the product that’s outstanding.

So any time I’ve got this in a wall, it is not going to retain moisture?

No, no, not at all.

Ok, so that also leads to I don’t want to obviously set it into a trough or something like that, that would catch the moisture. So we’ll get into that in a minute.

But one of the big things that people have talked about lately is the deal with the lead times.

Obviously, there there are ways out any relief on lead times in the future and being able to get product into people’s hands a little quicker. What are you guys his thoughts on that?

Yeah, you can. We do have a factory being built in in West Virginia. It’s it’s been a long, long time coming for that factory to be completed, but it’ll be complete in the middle of the year this year, we’re going to say June of this year. So that’ll bring some relief to the lead times. Outstanding. Yeah, but the lead times are really because of the demand in the industry. And I think you guys have seen that there’s demand for every type of installation out there right now and everything from fiberglass to stonewall to to granule it to to fome. People are just taking whatever they can get. And it’s it’s it’s a matter of demand, supply and demand for us. We just can’t we can’t keep up right now. And we’re trying and we will be able to once the factory comes along.

Beautiful. Now that Brant’s factory. So what does that do in terms of your capacity? Does it add 10 percent, 20 percent, 30 percent?

Sure. So the Rantzen factory will be our fourth Stonewall factory in North America. So I guess you could say a word. Brandon, what do you think we’re adding? Twenty five percent if we’re.

Yeah. Have twenty five to thirty percent. Probably based off of the size of the factory.

Yeah. I’m sure it’s probably the most innovative, most kick butt factory that could be made. So it’s certainly probably going to add quite a bit of breadth to what you guys can do.

Yeah. And you know what it’s going to be it’s going to be fired by natural gas. We use natural gas to to. Manufacture the product, whereas most of our other factories around the world use a coal based product called Coke, there are some others around the world that do use natural gas. But this is the first one in North America, really.

So is that going to take quite a bit less energy than to do it?

I would say so. I would say yes. And it’s more favorable to the community out there. And it’s going to take less trucks coming in with the Coke that it’s needed to fire a normal factory of ours or a different factory of ours. I just think it’s a better solution. It goes along with that sustainability conversation as well.

That’s good, because architects right now embodied energy and what it takes to actually make a product is a pretty big deal. It’s something that architects are focusing on. And, you know, when you think of that, obviously you guys have really been growing exponentially over the years. Mineral wool has kind of caught fire. What would you say is in terms of your products, what is your fastest growing market?

For us, I want to say that the exterior wall products are our fastest growing market right now, our fastest growing opportunity.

When you say exterior, are you talking commercial like cavity rock or are you talking. That’s in residential.

I’m talking exterior wall of the envelope of a building. So cavity rock cover board, Curt Rock, those products on residential and commercial buildings. We’ve got to specifications team out there working with architects to make sure that we’re included in those specifications because of things like NFPA eighty five and fire concerns, also moisture concerns and sustainable R value concerns on buildings, again, whether it’s residential or commercial. So I think that’s a huge opportunity for us moving forward in the US and North America, frankly.

Well, certainly with the code moving insulation to the outside of the building, you guys are going to play a big part in that because that goes right back to moisture.

If we want the building to dry out, then, you know, having the outside of the building have a very low or a very high amount of Perm’s available is a good thing.

Yeah. Yeah, right.

We want we know that moisture is going to get behind that facade on a building and we want it to be able to drive outward. We don’t want it to dry in. And that’s a big part of the conversation.

That’s perfect now on the I think we talked about this before, but the blown in insulation, we have so many insulators and you know, there was obviously the company in Texas at one point that made a lot of loose film mineral fiber type insulation.

Are you guys doing any kind of blowing wool or anything like that?

Right now? We don’t offer anything in the IT. Part of the business years back, I want to say, almost when I started, we we tried to get into something like that, but the machines we felt weren’t the right fit for our product, the machines that are out there right now. So we stopped that. And we don’t have anything to offer right now, but we’re always looking to expand. And I think we’re doing some research on that on that end as well. And if you have anything.

Yeah, I mean, we we are looking into it.

And it’s one of the, I think, many different applications that we’re looking at entering or entering again with some of this updated technology that are coming into the new factories. Now, it is certainly a possibility down the road.

Now, are there any other new products you guys are working on or anything you can divulge any anything coming out?

Well, we we just launched our our cavity rock black line, so that’s a great new product for exterior wall insulation. So I’m sure everybody has heard of cavity rock and it comes on faced at the moment. But Cavity Rock Black is used behind an open jointed facade. So where you have metal wall panels on the exterior of a building where you can see through the joints or the seams of the panels. A lot of architects like it to be dark and or a different color than green or unphased for. So we put a black face on it. So it’s aesthetically pleasing and architects just love it.

Oh, they love open joint cladding and being able to get that three dimensional look back in behind the panel.

Yeah, yeah. The other product is we introduced a few new comfort that our values last year are thirteen, are twenty one and are thirty eight. So typically what you would see in the market is this comfort that AR 15 are twenty three and our thirty to give you that added value added our value. So subcontractor’s get put in a product with, with a little bit more value to give to give the homeowner or the building owner peace of mind that they’re getting, they’re getting more for their money. So we introduce something to to do go along with code for that contractor that maybe they don’t really they’re not offering an added value like that. They just want to go ahead and go along with the code of our thirteen or twenty one or thirty eight. So we just introduced those last year as well for wouldst cavities.

And what about install features? I mean, obviously the mineral wool from years past was kind of crunchy and not so fun to put in. But are there enhancements that have been made in the last few years and things like that to make the install easier, better, faster, things like that suggestion’s?

You know, I’ll start with that. And I think our product is is very well put together. I would say from recycled material standpoint, we’re up to 40 percent recycled material. And a lot of people have found that the more natural material that we use, the more basalt rock that we use, the better the quality. So it’s not necessarily falling apart in your hands. It’s not really brittle, stays together when it comes out of the bag and you install it. Our products are also friction fit the back products are friction fit products. So you stand them up in the wall cavity press and into the wall cavity and they stay there. They don’t slump over time. They don’t sag over time. Cavity rock products are really great to use on facades that have different radiuses. They conform to those. And and I think I think they’re really easy to use. I thought in my basement of installed them in friends houses and I think they’re really easy to use. Brendin, what do you what do you think?

Yeah, the only thing I would add to the install ability of our products and specifically about the bats is that we kind of market our flexible edge that we have on our comfort that products which really add to that compression fit, that friction fit that Jason talked about and really is just you’re answering the bat into the studs. You compress it slightly and that flexible fit really lets you compress it to be able to fit it into the stutt. And then when you release it, it kind of expands back out and fills that space and leaves no gaps in between the insulation studs that that kind of install ability with with our back products is really something that we try to push and get out there to to let people know how to actually install it.

I like that.

That’s got to be a much easier way to achieve grade one because you don’t want any of those gaps going down the edges when you install those. So that’s that’s a great point.

Now, Brenin, the next thing I wanted to ask is still on the install ability piece.

Are there any fastening systems you guys really like that are newer out there into the market? Because we start looking at cavity rock in the growth of cavity, rock and exterior installations, even in terms of residential, what really are what would be your top picks for fastening systems for those?

I mean, Jason might have a little bit more on on actual systems as he’s out in the field a little bit more than him. But just on I guess on the residential side, I would say our basic recommendation is to use really just ferring strips and and nails to to fast and try to make it as easy as possible in that residential side on an more commercial construction for our capital products. Some of the more energy efficient fiberglass clip and rail systems, I think is is something we more geared towards more because of that energy efficiency. You’re not losing so much because of that steel that you might have on some of the other systems.

So some of those newer systems, I think, is something that we would want to do to drive a little bit more towards.

Yeah, I’d agree, bring it in and really can it’s all about the system, it’s all about the facade. If the facade is brick, then obviously there’s going to be brick ties and stick pins and washers included in there. If it’s a great system, obviously, you’re going to have Gert’s along with stick pins and washers. Of course, you’ve got these more advanced systems like Brendan touched on the clip and rail like Smart S.I, Cascadia clip, even Nightwatch clips. Those are all those are all being thought of more often now because of the sustainability of buildings. We don’t want our value to be lost on exterior wall. So how are we how are we how we’re keeping the value in rather than letting it escape the one that really in my mind that I see its architects drive specifications.

And when you look at why architects are switching to your product, what do you think is the main drivers for architects to switch to your product?

You know, can I think the big one right now is fire nine combustibility that really comes into play as far as commercial buildings go. Usually it’s because of to eighty five being triggered, being included in the new building code. We soon will, it means that achieving NFPA to eighty five assemblies that pass are pretty simple. So that’s that’s the big thing. The other part of it is durability of our material. Obviously, we talked about it being exposed to to moisture and water, but also maintaining a consistent performance across all aspects of a project or a build. It can be left exposed for another construction period or a construction timeline. It can it’s going to stand up over the life of the building after it’s installed and of course, sustainability. We talked about our factory being more sustainable. We talked about how using Rockwool products can help buildings become more sustainable. And Rockwool is really getting to be a net carbon negative company with our Stoneville installation saving one hundred times the energy consumed and CO2 emitted in its production. So we’re saving more or or saving more energy versus what it takes to actually produce it. So that’s also a big thing with architects, because, like you said, they’re all about sustainability nowadays.

So what is this red list?

The last of the list is, yeah, it’s basically a list of of ingredients that products may have that can be deemed to be potentially harmful for for humans.

And the yeah, I think that’s that’s kind of the main the gist of what the relist is. And there’s there’s a quite a number of ingredients that are included on that list.

And do you guys use anything from the red list?

So we have the the one ingredient that we do have is formaldehyde in our products, a very low amount. I would say of formaldehyde, but it is on the red list. And we do say that we do have that ingredient into our products. But the one thing I would point out with the red list is something called the declare label, which we also do have, which which means that we declare a certain amount of ingredients in our products. We declare what is in our products. We try to be as open and transparent about what is actually included into our products. And because of the low levels that we have of formaldehyde in our products, we can actually get red list approved, declare labels on.

A majority of our products, if not all of them, and just based off of, again, how much of the ingredient we have in our product and how much we actually are transparent with the different ingredients that we include.

Beautiful. Well, my last question is actually probably my biggest one, and that is this age old argument. So obviously you guys are used a lot for sound and we always talk about mineral.

Well, when we talk about sound, are you guys actually better for sound than most of the other products? And can you prove it?

I just because I get asked all the time what’s best for sound, what has the best sound attenuation, where does marketing stop and where does the the actual numbers come in? Are you guys really the best for sound or what’s the deal on that one.

Yeah, I’ll, I’ll start here and I’ll say we are very good for sound and acoustic control. We have a number of examples of things like our sound tunnel where you can actually feel the difference walking through that just with our three inches of safe and sound in that. I think one of the big differences there is I’ll talk about the fit of the product. So really having that that really tight fit in in the studs, I think makes a big impact on the acoustic control.

And not having those gaps, I think make a big difference between our product and maybe some other products in terms of acoustics.

So when we consider sound, if we’re looking at that, don’t you guys have a lot of resources also for contractors on dealing with sound and sound control assemblies and things like that?

Yeah, we have a number of of different guides and assemblies, both on the interior and exterior of the walls that give STC an ITC rated assemblies for four different construction types, different materials and different products.

So most people understand STC being sound transmission. What’s a ITC?

Oh, ITC is a little bit of a newer rating, so it stands for outdoor indoor transmission class, I believe. And it’s kind of a newer way of looking at sound transmission, and I believe it takes into account a lot more of the sound moving around the wall and through different surfaces and things like that.

And it’s a little bit more of a robust look at sound transmission when comparing to an STC class.

So I have to say, I was in Arizona and there’s a city out there by the airport where they actually want you to take readings inside and outside because rather than to your point, rather than just considering the wall, they want the ceiling included with that and what happens between the roof and everything, because you’ve got airplanes going overhead and obviously a lot of street noise and other noise coming through. So it makes sense to go to an all encompassing number instead of testing a wall and hoping the wall performs in situ as opposed to the actual building.

So it makes total sense. Do you guys have resources on your website for things like this?

Yeah, yeah, we have a few different catalogs and brochures that have a different ball, ratings, full assemblies with with these ratings, we’re developing more as we speak actually now with with full catalogues of both interior and exterior assemblies that will be available rather soon.

That can be used for for any type of building assembly, basically.

And it’s also probably worth mentioning that our technical services department up in Milton, Ontario, is great at looking at different assemblies and given giving a little bit of a judgment on how they think it will perform with all the pieces of the assembly.

Oh, beautiful, so they can obviously, if an architect’s asking a lot of questions, they can be diverted up to your technical assistance team.

Yes, technical technical services and are are building science team. Got a team of building science folks on staff that does a lot of work with RDA in Vancouver, people like John Straube, where we can look at a bunch of different assemblies for architects that they want on their buildings and really dive into what’s your actual value going to be? Where are you going to have your do points? What’s what’s all that analysis come down to?

Yeah, beautiful. Well, I would say by the time you give an architect something from Dr. Straube, you’ve pretty much hit the nail on the head.

Probably won’t be much more debate or a wonderful guys will.

Thank you so much for taking your time today and being part of the podcast.

Hopefully this really gives people a much better idea around Rockwool and Mineral Wuhl and using these types of products in assemblies and why they should move to this type of product as well. So thank you so much for being part of this. Yeah. Thank you. Can appreciate you having us on.

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